gallery Dear Adoption, I’m Hurting

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Dear Adoption, I’m Hurting

You took me away to make me better,
you said it’s the only way,
but I never recovered who I am,
it’s like this, still today.

I am supposed to thank you for this,
I’m supposed to be grateful,
my mum I lost and do so miss,
adoption, you are sinful.

I’ll never forget and not forgive,
what you did to me,
I am, with help, beginning to live,
but this, at fifty three.

Jerry Meehan. Lives in NY; originally from Sligo Ireland. Born in 1963. Adopted in 1965. Found birth family, but it didn’t work out. Mum had already passed. Moving on gradually.

7 comments

  1. Reblogged this on Gazelle's Scirocco Winds and commented:
    This adoptee, now 53, is like so many of us unable to forgive what our collective societies heaped upon us with no permission asked of us. His short poem says it all… He like me and others will remember what was taken from us and what was pressed upon us that we instinctively knew and know to be a tissue of lies …

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  2. Hello, Jerry. Just know that you never walk alone with your feelings. There are legions of us out here who commiserate with your hurt and your sorrow. Keep the faith and your courage and fight on for your preservation- not that of the state or the nation, but of your ancestors who are incorporated in every fibre of your being.
    I well know the horror o f being ripped from my immediate family by my own parents. To this day -I am 20 years older than you-the trauma is still there just under the surface. And any who would have the audacity to suggest that you or I or others should just simply forget about it have no idea the psychological scar an even like this leaves… I was forever separated from my sister and brother, from close family… never to know my 2 sets of grandparents or my many, many cousins, or my aunts and all but one uncle… or even my parents…
    The sins are of the societies and their agents who collude to take our identities from us and tell us lies; worse, we are treated like minors even into maturity. Never forget that you are the only innocent in these events…
    If you haven’t done so, I would encourage your having your DNA analyzed for the resources it can give you to know who YOU are …and from whence and who your ancestors are. Who knows? You may be related to an Irish King named Niall who lived in the 3rd c AD (CE).
    You have my great empathy and sympathy. Best wishes!

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  3. Feel the pain as most of us do, I’ve found my parents, had a letter but it’s hurting adoptive parent to her core,?it sux being between rock & hard places when where in a hard place to begin with, just so you know seeing adoptees moving forward helps others I assure you

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  4. Hi Jerry,

    Thank you for sharing your story. Your poem is beautiful.

    Adoption, thrust upon you, is a huge loss. Firstly, loosing your connection to the Emerald Isle and then the pain of searching, only to have discovered that your birth mother had ready passed away. The Irish are survivors, a trait which you have always had all your life, not just at 53 years young.

    Yes, there is a very sinful aspect to adoption and those who have told you all your life, ‘how grateful you should be”, are not only abhorrent, but suffer from a deluded sense of superiority.

    You know to well, that the primal wound can have long life lasting effects.

    Blessings and the luck of the Irish to you,

    Aimee

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  5. Hi Jerry,

    Your poem is beautiful, so thank you for sharing your story. Too many Irish have lost their connection to the Emerald Isle and also finding out your bio mother had already died, must have been devastating for you.

    The primal would, which you know all too well, can last a life time. Those who abhorrent people who talk down to others who’ve come from less fortunate circumstances, with comments such as “you should be grateful’, suffer from a deluded sense of superiority.

    The Irish are survivors and this is a trait you have had all your life, not just at 53 years young.

    Blessings and the luck of the Irish to you

    Like

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